Where do you get your IDEAS!

Ron Lewis
4 min readFeb 1, 2022

Ron Lewis

Image acquired at Adobe Stock

Where do you get your IDEAS!

Why do people ask this question? Every writer understands this question. Guess what? Most of us hate the question. Okay, most writers I know hate this question. I don’t hate the question. Personally, I’m not too fond of the question, but I don’t hate it.

Yes, we get ideas for stories, and we write from the germ of inspiration. However, to pin down, at times, the exact place the notion came from can be difficult. My mind catalogs and stores people’s conversations, discussions, arguments, marriage proposals, guys’ comments about women, women’s observations about men, and a myriad of other sundry things, which I am not participating. We call it eavesdropping, which I do without realizing.

Once these dialogues become embedded in my subconscious, they often leak out as conversations between characters in my stories. Also, I’m an avid reader. Like a sponge, I suck up stories, plot points, historical events, and tiny personal things from histories I have studied. All this inevitably leaches out into my written words.

I’m not talking about rewriting other people’s works or plagiarism, but there is nothing new under the sun, as the Bible says. Everything that has happened will happen again, again, and again.

One case in point, in the early 1940s, a murder happened in a home in Denver, Colorado. The case is called the Spider Man Case or the Denver Spider Man. Notice, I don’t use the — between the words Spider and Man; he isn’t a superhero.

What we do have, is a real-life locked-room mystery. Only it was a sealed home mystery. A man named Philip Peters was murdered in his home all alone while his wife, Helen, recuperated at St. Anthony’s Hospital after breaking her hip in a fall.

The basic facts of the crime are as follows. First, only one family member was home at the time of the murder, the victim. Second, the front and rear doors were locked and bolted from the inside of the house. Add to this, all windows were bolted shut from the inside, and there was no sign of forced entry. A search of the home, top to bottom, or bottom to top, found no one hiding in the house.

Ron Lewis

Ron Lewis has had a lifelong interest and love of both history and westerns.